Chrome Hill Walk: 3 Routes to the Spectacular Summit Views

Chrome Hill Walk: 3 Routes to the Spectacular Summit Views

Chrome Hill is a true gem of the Peak District. With its distinctive dragon’s back shape, stunning views and growing popularity, Chrome Hill is quickly becoming one of the top Peak District walks. So, if this sounds like your cup of tea, you need to keep reading this guide to 3 different Chrome Hill walk routes.

With my helpful information on the best time to visit (and how to avoid crowds), directions and downloadable GPS maps, you’ll be able to choose the walk best suited to you! But, all that really matters is that every route gets you to the top of Chrome Hill where you can enjoy some of the most special views in the national park.

Where is Chrome Hill?
How High is Chrome Hill?
Can You Walk Up Chrome Hill?
What’s the Best Time to Climb Chrome Hill?
How to get to Chrome Hill

Chrome Hill Walk from Glutton Bridge (Circular Route)
Chrome Hill Walk from Earl Sterndale (Circular Route)
Chrome Hill Walk from Glutton Bridge (Straight Route)

Where is Chrome Hill?

Chrome Hill is located in the heart of the Peak District National Park. It’s positioned on the Derbyshire-Staffordshire border in the Upper Dove Valley.

The peak of Chrome Hill is approximately 4 miles south of the spa town of Buxton as the crow flies. Additionally, it’s also very easy to get to Chrome Hill on foot from the nearby villages of Earl Sterndale, Hollinsclough and Longnor.

The sun sets over the Peak District with a great view from the top of Chrome Hill. The steep walk up Chrome Hill is worth it for this!

How High is Chrome Hill?

The peak of Chrome Hill measures 425 metres above sea level. Meaning, it towers over its easterly neighbour, Parkhouse Hill (360 metres).

Can You Walk Up Chrome Hill?

Yes – I go into more detail on the different routes below! But, it is totally possible to walk to the top of Chrome Hill – no trespassing required, as the route is mostly roads and permissive paths.

Permissive paths are those that are on private land but the landowner has allowed the public to use. However, these paths are not public rights of way, can be subject to certain rules (eg. no bicycles, dogs) and access can be revoked at any time.

On the final uphill stretch to the peak of Chrome Hill against the glowing sunset in the Peak District

What’s the Best Time to Climb Chrome Hill?

The views of and from Chrome Hill can be enjoyed at any time of the day. However, I know Chrome Hill can get exceptionally busy during the day.

But, for simply breathtaking views, you should definitely aim to reach the peak for sunrise or sunset on a fairly clear day. The soft, glowing light illuminates Chrome Hill and surrounding areas in a truly magical way.

Of course, while sunrise is a lot later between late autumn and early spring, you are much more likely to encounter cloud, fog and rain. On the other hand, there are better conditions in the summer months but sunrise can be as early as 4.30 am with first light almost 2 hours earlier.

Sunset may be a better option for timing, but the more sociable hour means you could find that the walk is quite busy. I would recommend taking this Chrome Hill Walk at sunset on a weekday as a balance. I visited on a Wednesday evening in time for sunset in early May and only saw one other person! The emptiness really added to its charm.

Heading to the Lake District? If so, you HAVE to walk up one of the many peaks for incredible views over the whole area. This Old Man Coniston Walk is less popular than Scafell Pike but still has outrageously good views! Check it out!

Looking north over the Peak District during this Chrome Hill walk for beautiful rolling hills and blue skies

How to get to Chrome Hill

Despite its location in the heart of the Peak District, Chrome Hill is actually quite isolated. This, in addition to the fact that there is only one path up/down to the summit, means that there are only a few places you can start the walk from that don’t require unnecessary mileage.

The closest two villages that best suit circular walks are Glutton Bridge and Earl Sterndale. Glutton Bridge is closer but Earl Sterndale has more parking as well as a pub and accommodation options. Both of these circular walks are described below.

Another option is to take a straight there-and-back walking route from Glutton Bridge to the top of Chrome Hill. This is the quickest and shortest option, and still gives you exception views and a total sense of accomplishment after completing it. The choice is all yours!

Chrome Hill Walk from Glutton Bridge (Circular Route)

Download file for GPS

Distance: 3.9 miles/6.2 kilometres
Difficulty: Moderate
Walking time: 2.5 to 3.5 hours

Start and endpoint: Glutton Bridge

From Glutton Bridge, head off of the main road (B5053, Buxton Road) along the single track road next to the grey telephone box. After about 600 metres, the path splits and you need to take the right fork. Continue for around 300 metres, then turn left off of the road at the cattle grid and onto a path (over a stile).

Keep to the trodden path as it steeply makes its way towards the top of Chrome Hill. Although, don’t forget to look behind you to get a good view of Parkhouse Hill. The climb might be difficult (and your legs might be sore), but, at the summit, you’ll be rewarded with incredible views of the Peak District!

As a word of caution, sheep do roam on Chrome Hill. Remember to give them plenty of space, especially in lambing season when they are particularly protective of their babies.

Once you’ve finished taking in the view from the summit, continue northwest along the path as it covers the ridge of Chrome Hill and then descends. Still on high ground, the path weaves its way through various fields towards Stoop Farm. The path crosses a road to the right of the farm and here you need to turn right onto the road and then right again after 100 metres.

Next, you need to follow the road for 1.3 km and then turn left off of the road and onto a path. Luckily, that 1.3 km is all downhill and you’ll be feeling as light as a feather! After 700 metres, the path forks – take the most right option. In another 700 metres, you’ll get to Glutton Farm. The permissive path continues alongside the farm and back to the B5053 road (Buxton Road). Head right on this main road to return to the starting point of the grey telephone box.

Chrome Hill Walk from Earl Sterndale (Circular Route)

Download file for GPS

Distance: 4.7 miles/7.6 kilometres
Difficulty: Moderate
Walking time: 3 to 4 hours

Start and endpoint: The Quiet Woman Pub in Earl Sterndale

The path to Chrome Hill heads out the back of the Quiet Woman Pub. Keep to this path as it runs parallel to the dry stone walls and then crosses the field to join another path at Underhill Cottage. At the cottage, turn right and continue until you reach the B5053 at Glutton Bridge.

Turn left onto the main left and then right onto the smaller road next to the grey telephone box. Follow the road along for 600 metres as it runs next to Parkhouse Hill, then keep right as it forks. Turn off the road and onto the path on the left of the road at the cattle grid after 300 metres. Then, keep to the well-walked path all the way to the top of Chrome Hill.

The start of the path that leads to the top of Chrome Hill!
At the cattle grid turn left off of the road, over this stile and onto the path that leads to the top of Chrome Hill.

With bird’s eye views of the surrounding hills and wide Peak area, you’ll want to savour your time at the summit of Chrome Hill. But, what goes up, must come down and that is where you’re heading next! Keep to the trodden path as it slowly descends from the peak towards Stoop Farm. Here, join the small road and shortly after turn right onto the road that runs downhill.

After approximately 1.3 km, turn left onto a path, which you need to follow straight for 800 metres until you come to another road. Here, turn right and continue straight all the way back into the village of Earl Sterndale (straight at the crossroads after 700 metres).

Looking for even more spectacularly scenic walks? Then, you have to visit the Yorkshire Dales! And, I’ve written about some of the most beautiful walks there are – check it out!

Chrome Hill Walk from Glutton Bridge (Straight Route)

Download file for GPS

Distance: 2.1 miles/3.4 kilometres
Difficulty: Moderate
Walking time: 1.5 to 2 hours

Start and endpoint: Glutton Bridge

Circular routes are often preferred to see more of an area and avoid the feeling of retracing your steps. However, a straight route is well suited for Chrome Hill for two reasons…

Firstly, Chrome Hill is the only landmark on the circular routes, the remaining parts of the walk are through the countryside – which is scenic but not anything special. Secondly, when you walk one way uphill you mostly look at the ground to make sure you’re following the path and not losing your footing. As such, when you walk back downhill you have a completely different view as you can look out over the surrounding area. So, if you’re looking for a quick, short, there-and-back route – this is for you!

The closest starting point with parking available is Glutton Bridge. From here, head down the single track road next to the grey telephone box. Keep right as the path splits and continue until you reach the next cattle grid. Here, take the path on the left of the road.

The ascent of Chrome Hill starts here! And, while it’s steep and rocky in places, it’s easy enough to follow the well-trodden path to the summit. The views at the top are incredible and after the hard work of getting there, you’ll definitely want to enjoy them for as long as possible!

From the summit, simply walk back the same way you came… Down the eastern side of Chrome Hill and along the road all the way back to Glutton Bridge.

Incredible views on this short walk with both rocky and rolling hills the landscape contrasts in this area of the Peak District

If you have any questions or want any more information drop a comment below and I’ll get back to you!

Information correct as of June 2021 but is subject to change in future.


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